Lent podcast episode 5: Lent & Diet

In the fifth episode of the series we look at Mid-Lent Sunday, traditionally a day where lots of different celebrations occurred, but we focus on Mothering Sunday and the lesser known Clipping the Church.

Neil with David Walker, Bishop of Manchester

Neil bakes a simnel cake and chats again to the Right Reverend David Walker, Bishop of Manchester, about the history of Mothering Sunday, which is not necessarily the same as Mothering Sunday.

Neil then looks at the evidence that suggests that fasting has many potential health benefits and puts theory to the test by going on a two weeklong fast of his own. There are mixed results and mood swings aplenty.

The only thing Neil could be bothered to do. *Hangs head in shame*

There’s also the answer to Professor Matthew Cobb’s minnow mystery from last week.

Produced by Beena Khetani. Made in Manchester by Sonder Radio.

Links and extra stuff:

David Walker’s page on the Church of England website: https://www.manchester.anglican.org/bishop-manchester/

My recipe for Simnel Cake: https://britishfoodhistory.com/2018/03/19/simnel-cake/

Diabetes and fasting study in more detail: https://www.healthline.com/health-news/intermittent-fasting-and-type-2-diabetes

Lab mice and fasting study in more detail: https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/fasting-increases-health-lifespan-male-mice

3 Comments

Filed under baking, Britain, cooking, Easter, Festivals, food, General, history, Recipes, Uncategorized

3 responses to “Lent podcast episode 5: Lent & Diet

  1. I think they eat a lot of dates while fasting in the Middle East, but I think dates would have been a very expensive and exotic food in Medieval England. Apparently eating rabbit burns as many calories as it provides – though it’s definitely not a fish!

    • Yes I’m sure dates were a God send. It probably would have been allowed too, especially in the later medieval era when type of food trumped hunger or number of calories

      • Apparently they bring your glucose levels back to normal very quickly. During Ramadan, people eat 3 dates when they break their fast.

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